A woman who lives in the west is looking for an Asian buyer for her handicraft business.

The woman’s name is Hina.

She works as an African woman’s assistant.

She says her business has been in the same business since she was about five years old.

“I know the Chinese, I know the Koreans, I’ve worked for them for the last 20 years, I work with them in the workshop, I’m an assistant in the shop,” she said.

“But I feel a little bit left out.

There’s no Asian, black, or white women around in my town.”

She says she’s trying to find a buyer for the business because she’s not a white person.

“It’s hard for me to find an Asian or an African, a black or a white woman, to take a chance on this,” she says.

“They don’t come to my town.

They don’t like me, they don’t know my business.”

“My business is still my business,” she added.

“If there’s a black man coming to buy my business, I can’t do anything.

I’ve got to look for another business.”

She has been trying to sell her shop to Asian buyers for about six months now, but they haven’t been able to come to terms with her.

“For the past six months I’ve been trying very hard to find another buyer for my business.

It’s very hard, I feel like it’s a bit of a gamble,” she explained.

“Because of the price, I think it’s very difficult for me.”

The woman has tried contacting the government and the trade body of the African trade unions, but to no avail.

“My life is not that simple.

There are many Asian women who don’t want to do this for the money, so I’m trying to make a living selling my handmade goods and I hope to get a chance,” she told the ABC.

“We need to support the community, and I know if I can, we can make a difference.”

Hina says she was lucky to have a black mother and a white father, and the mother of her daughters also worked as a woman’s helper.

“At the end of the day, I don’t feel like I’m going to be able to make any money because of the illness I’m in, or because of how I look.” “

Now I feel very fortunate to be a woman, but I’m still in a state of limbo,” she continued.

“At the end of the day, I don’t feel like I’m going to be able to make any money because of the illness I’m in, or because of how I look.”

Hine has been selling her handicaps for about two years and she’s been receiving money for the past two years from the trade union of the Australian African Trade Union, which represents African women in Australia.

“All of my other handicraft shops are still shut,” she admitted.

“There are only three shops left in my business right now, I have a contract with another trade union, so the other shop is closed.”

Hines handicraft is a colourful and colourful business.

Her shop has a range of handicraft products, including a basket of cotton, a basket with bamboo, baskets of rice, and a basket made of hemp.

Her goods include a pair of shoes, handkerchiefs, bags, blankets, and bracelets.

“You can see how much the people in the town know about handicraft,” Hine said.

She hopes to continue selling her shop, as she is currently doing, for another six months or so.

A few years ago, Hina sold her shop for $600,000. “

Sometimes I feel sad, but at the same time I want to make the community proud.”

A few years ago, Hina sold her shop for $600,000.

But she says the situation is very different now.

“This is something new for me.

“And people say, ‘oh you sell so many items, so you can’t afford to sell one,'” she said, laughing. “

People don’t understand how much I love my handicaps,” she concluded.

“And people say, ‘oh you sell so many items, so you can’t afford to sell one,'” she said, laughing.

“That’s the problem, I want my customers to understand, because I don, I just sell one, I love it, so why should anyone else?”

Read more about the ABC’s African Trade Workers report here.

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